What Does It Mean To Crate Train A Dog

What Does It Mean To Crate Train A Dog

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Crate training is a popular way to housebreak a dog, as well as to provide him with a safe place to sleep and relax. When you crate train your dog, you are teaching him to think of his crate as his home- a place where he is safe and comfortable.

The first step in crate training is to introduce your dog to the crate. Place the crate in a quiet, comfortable place in your home and put a few of your dog’s favorite toys inside. Allow your dog to explore the crate at his own pace. Some dogs will immediately take to the crate and crawl inside, while others may be more hesitant. If your dog is hesitant, you can encourage him to enter the crate by placing a treat or toy inside.

Once your dog is comfortable in the crate, you can start using it to housebreak him. When you see your dog start to potty, say “go to your crate” and immediately take him to the crate. Once he is inside, praise him and give him a treat. If he continues to potty in the crate, you may need to increase the amount of time he spends in the crate.

The crate can also be used as a place for your dog to relax and sleep. Dogs often see their crates as a safe place, and will go to the crate when they want to relax or take a nap.



Crate training can be a valuable tool for both housebreaking and training your dog. With a little patience and consistency, your dog will soon learn to love his crate!

Crate Trained Dog Now Hates Crate

If you have a dog that once loved its crate and has now turned against it, you’re not alone. It’s a pretty common scenario: your dog is initially perfectly happy to be crated, but at some point, seemingly out of nowhere, it decides that the crate is the worst place ever. Your dog may start whining and barking whenever you try to put it in the crate, or it may simply refuse to go near the crate at all.

There are a lot of possible reasons why a dog might start hating its crate. Maybe your dog was initially crate trained using positive reinforcement, but then you started using punishment (e.g. yelling, locking the dog in the crate) when it acted out. This can cause the dog to start associating the crate with fear and anxiety, which can lead to crate aversion.

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Another possibility is that your dog is experiencing some type of physical discomfort when crated. Dogs can develop crate anxiety if they’re experiencing pain from a medical condition, such as hip dysplasia or arthritis. They may also become anxious if they’re having trouble urinating or defecating because of an obstruction or other problem.

If you think that your dog’s aversion to the crate may be due to physical discomfort, you should take it to the vet for a check-up. If it turns out that your dog is in pain, your vet can recommend appropriate treatment.

If it’s not clear why your dog is suddenly hating its crate, your best bet is to consult with a behaviorist or trainer. They can help you figure out what’s causing the problem and develop a plan to help your dog overcome its crate aversion.

How To Crate Train Older Dog

If you have an older dog that you would like to crate train, there are a few things you need to keep in mind. First, it’s important to realize that dogs of all ages can be crate trained, but the process may take a bit longer for older dogs.

The key to successful crate training is to make the experience positive for your dog. You want him to associate the crate with good things, such as treats and playtime.

Start by placing the crate in a quiet, comfortable spot in your home. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate, along with a few of your dog’s favorite toys. Give your dog a treat every time he enters the crate.

Once your dog is comfortable entering the crate, start closing the door for short periods of time. gradually increase the amount of time the door is closed. If your dog seems stressed or anxious, open the door and let him out.

Don’t push your dog too hard or he may start to associate the crate with negative experiences. Go at your dog’s pace, and be patient. With a little time and patience, you can successfully crate train your older dog.

Diggs Groov Dog Crate Training Tool

The Diggs Groov Dog Crate Training Tool is an excellent way to keep your pet safe and secure while you’re away. The tool is designed to fit most standard-sized crates and features a sturdy, adjustable strap that attaches securely to the crate. The Groov also features a comfortable, padded handle that makes it easy to move your pet around.

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The Groov is perfect for crate training your pet. The comfortable handle makes it easy to move your pet in and out of the crate, and the adjustable strap ensures a secure fit. The Groov is also great for travel – the padded handle makes it easy to carry your pet through the airport or to your car.

The Diggs Groov Dog Crate Training Tool is the perfect way to keep your pet safe and secure while you’re away.

How To Get A Dog Crate Trained

Getting a dog crate trained may seem difficult, but with a little bit of patience and some easy tips, your dog will be crate trained in no time!

1. Start by slowly introducing your dog to the crate. Put a few treats inside and let your dog explore. Praise your dog when he or she enters the crate.

2. Once your dog is comfortable going into the crate, start closing the door for a few seconds at a time. gradually increase the amount of time the door is closed.

3. If your dog starts to whine or bark when the door is closed, don’t open it right away. wait until your dog is quiet before opening the door. This will help your dog learn that whining and barking won’t get him or her what they want.

4. Once your dog is crate trained, use it as a place for your dog to rest or nap, and not as a place to punish your dog.







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