How To Crate Train A Stubborn Dog

How To Crate Train A Stubborn Dog

There are stubborn dogs and then there are dogs that are downright impossible to crate train. If your dog falls into the latter category, do not despair – there is still hope. The key is to be consistent and to be prepared to put in a lot of effort.

The first step is to make sure your dog is comfortable in his crate. Some dogs will naturally take to it, but others may need a little encouragement. Start by putting a few treats in the crate and then letting your dog inside. Give him a few minutes to explore and then praise him when he comes out. Gradually increase the amount of time he spends in the crate and give him a treat every time he goes inside.

Once your dog is comfortable in the crate, it’s time to start training him to go inside on cue. Say “crate” in a happy voice and give him a treat when he goes inside. Be sure to praise him enthusiastically when he does what you want. If your dog tries to get out of the crate, say “no” in a firm voice and put him back inside.

If your dog is still resistant to the crate, you may need to get a little creative. Try using a baby gate to block him from going into the room where the crate is located. Or, put the crate in a room he doesn’t like to go in (like the laundry room). Be persistent and consistent and eventually your dog will learn that going in the crate equals good things.

How To Crate Train Anxious Dog

Crate training is an important tool for managing anxiety in dogs. When done correctly, crate training can help your dog feel secure and safe, and can provide a calm, comfortable place to retreat to during periods of stress.

The key to successful crate training is to make the crate feel like a safe and comfortable place for your dog. Here are a few tips to help get you started:

1. Start by gradually introducing your dog to the crate. Don’t just put your dog in the crate and expect them to be happy about it. Instead, start by placing a blanket or toy inside the crate, and then gradually introduce your dog to the crate. Reward them for entering the crate and staying calm.

2. Make the crate a comfortable place for your dog. Place a soft blanket or pillow inside the crate, and make sure it’s big enough for your dog to lie down comfortably.

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3. Use positive reinforcement to encourage your dog to use the crate. When your dog enters the crate, reward them with a treat or a positive verbal cue.

4. Don’t use the crate as a punishment. If your dog starts to associate the crate with punishment, they’ll be less likely to want to spend time in it.

5. Don’t leave your dog in the crate for too long. Crating your dog for extended periods of time can actually increase their anxiety levels. Limit crating to a few hours at a time, and make sure your dog has plenty of opportunities to exercise and play.

If you’re struggling to crate train your anxious dog, consult with a professional dog trainer for help. They can provide more tips and advice on how to make the crate a positive experience for your dog.

How Long Do I Crate Train My Dog

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There’s no one definitive answer to this question. The length of time it takes to crate train your dog will depend on your dog’s temperament and personality, as well as your own dedication and commitment to the process. Some people may be able to crate train their dog in a matter of days, while others may find that it takes weeks or even months.

The key to successful crate training is to be patient and to take things slowly. You don’t want to rush your dog or force them into the crate. Instead, you should make the crate a positive experience for your dog, and take the time to introduce them to the crate gradually.

If you’re new to crate training, here are a few tips to help you get started:

1. Start by placing the crate in a quiet, low-traffic area of your home.



2. Place a soft blanket or towel in the crate, along with a few chew toys or treats.

3. Let your dog explore the crate on their own terms. Don’t force them inside or try to close the door while they’re inside.

4. Once your dog is comfortable with the crate, begin to close the door for short periods of time. gradually increase the amount of time your dog spends in the crate.

5. If your dog starts to whine or bark while in the crate, don’t give in and let them out. Wait until they stop whining or barking, and then release them from the crate.

6. Be consistent with your training and remain patient. Crate training can be a slow process, but it’s worth the effort in the end.

How To Potty Train A Dog Without A Crate

There are a few ways to potty train a dog without a crate. One way is to use a positive reinforcement technique. This technique uses treats and/or praise to reward the dog for going to the bathroom outside. Another way is to use a paper training technique. This technique uses newspapers or other absorbent materials placed in specific areas of the house to train the dog to go to the bathroom in those areas.

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Crate Training An Older Dog

Crate training an older dog can be a bit more challenging than crate training a young puppy, but it’s definitely doable. With a little patience and perseverance, you can successfully crate train your older dog and help him or her feel more comfortable and secure in the process.

The first step in crate training an older dog is to choose the right crate. Not all crates are created equal – some are too small, while others are too large. You’ll want to choose a crate that is just the right size for your dog, with enough room to stand up and turn around but not so much room that he or she can use it as a bathroom.

Once you’ve chosen the right crate, it’s time to start training your dog. The best way to do this is by gradually introducing your dog to the crate. Start by placing the crate in a quiet, low-traffic area of your home and placing a few of your dog’s favorite toys inside. Allow your dog to explore the crate on his or her own and don’t force him or her to enter.

Once your dog is comfortable with the crate, you can start using it as a place to put your dog when you’re not able to keep an eye on him or her. Start by putting your dog in the crate for short periods of time (5 to 10 minutes) and gradually increase the amount of time he or she spends in the crate.

If your dog begins to whine or bark while in the crate, don’t give in and let him or her out. This will only reinforce the behavior. Instead, wait until your dog is quiet before letting him or her out of the crate.

If you’re consistent with crate training an older dog, he or she will eventually come to see the crate as a safe and comfortable place to be.







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