Crate Training Rescue Dog

When you adopt a dog from a shelter or rescue organization, chances are good that the dog will come to you crate trained. This means that the dog has been taught to enter and stay in a crate willingly, and to eliminate outside the crate. Crate training is an important part of helping your new dog adjust to his or her new home, and can make housetraining and obedience training much easier.

The first step in crate training your new dog is to get him or her used to the idea of being in a crate. Start by putting the crate in a quiet, comfortable place in your home, and placing some soft bedding in the crate. Approach the crate calmly and offer a treat to your dog, encouraging him or her to go inside. Praise your dog when he or she does so, and give another treat when he or she comes out. Repeat this process until your dog is comfortable going into and out of the crate.

Next, begin to close the door to the crate while your dog is inside. Again, offer a treat and plenty of praise when your dog stays calm. If your dog starts to become agitated, open the door and give him or her a break. Gradually increase the amount of time that you leave the door closed, but always end on a positive note by letting your dog out of the crate when he or she seems calm and content.

The final step in crate training your new dog is to begin using the crate as a place to confinement. Only put your dog in the crate when you can watch him or her, and always provide plenty of water and safe chew toys. You can also use the crate as a place to put your dog when you’re not able to supervise him or her, such as during a nap or when you’re at work.

Crate training is an important part of helping your new dog adjust to his or her new home. By following these simple steps, you can help your dog learn to love his or her crate, and make housetraining and obedience training much easier.

How To Train Dog To Go In Crate

So you’ve decided to crate train your dog. Excellent decision! Crating your dog has many benefits, including housetraining, preventing destructive behavior, and providing a safe place for your dog to relax and rest.

The key to successful crate training is to make the crate a positive experience for your dog. Follow these tips to get started:

1. Start with short periods of time.

Begin by leaving your dog in the crate for short periods of time, gradually increasing the amount of time he spends in the crate. Puppies under six months of age should not be crated for more than three hours at a time, and adult dogs should not be crated for more than eight hours.

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2. Make the crate comfortable.

Make sure your dog has a comfortable place to sleep in the crate. You can put a soft blanket or towel in the crate, or you can buy a crate pad or bed.

3. Feed your dog in the crate.

Feeding your dog in the crate will help make the crate a positive experience for him. Put his food and water dishes inside the crate, and close the door while he eats.

4. Give your dog plenty of exercise.

A tired dog is less likely to get into trouble in the crate. Make sure your dog gets plenty of exercise before crating him.

5. Praise your dog when he behaves well in the crate.

rewarded with a treat or a toy. Positive reinforcement will help your dog associate the crate with good things and will make him more likely to behave well in the crate.

6. Don’t use the crate as a punishment.



Don’t use the crate as a punishment for your dog. The crate should be a place your dog looks forward to going to, not a place he fears.

If you follow these tips, your dog will soon be happily crate trained!

Dog Training Crate

: Why It Works

A dog training crate is a fantastic tool for teaching your dog new behaviors and for managing unwanted behaviors. Dogs are den animals and like to have a small, enclosed space to call their own. A dog training crate can provide this space and also serve as a place of security for your dog.

When you are training your dog, a dog training crate can be a great place for your dog to stay while you are working on other things. If your dog is having trouble with a behavior, you can put him in the crate and he will be out of trouble and safe. This will also help to prevent your dog from getting into trouble when you can’t watch him.

If your dog is having trouble with potty training, you can put him in the crate and he will be less likely to have an accident. When you let your dog out of the crate, you can take him outside to potty. If he goes potty, give him lots of praise and a treat. If he doesn’t go potty, bring him back inside and put him back in the crate.

A dog training crate can also be used as a place of confinement when you are not home. This can help to keep your dog safe and out of trouble.

When you are using a dog training crate, it is important to make sure that your dog is comfortable and happy in the crate. You should never use the crate as a punishment. The crate should be a happy place for your dog.

A dog training crate can be a great tool for training your dog and for managing unwanted behaviors. Dogs are den animals and like to have a small, enclosed space to call their own. A dog training crate can provide this space and also serve as a place of security for your dog.

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How To Crate Train An Older Dog With Separation Anxiety

Separation anxiety is a common problem in older dogs, but it can be successfully treated with crate training. The key is to make the crate feel like a safe and comfortable place for your dog.

Start by introducing your dog to the crate slowly. Put some treats or toys in the crate, and let your dog explore it at his own pace. Once your dog is comfortable going into the crate, start closing the door for short periods of time. Gradually increase the amount of time your dog spends in the crate.

If your dog starts to get anxious when you leave, try to stay calm and upbeat when you leave. You may also want to try leaving a radio or TV on to provide some noise and distraction.

When you come home, don’t immediately let your dog out of the crate. Instead, take him for a walk or give him some other attention to help him calm down. Once your dog is calm, let him out of the crate.

If you follow these guidelines, you can successfully crate train an older dog with separation anxiety.

Crate Training Big Dogs

If you have a big dog, you may be wondering how to crate train them. Crate training is a great way to housebreak your dog and can also help keep them safe when you’re not able to keep an eye on them.

The key to crate training a big dog is to start off slowly. Introduce your dog to the crate gradually, and only leave them in the crate for short periods of time. Once your dog is comfortable in the crate, you can gradually increase the amount of time they spend in it.

Be sure to provide your dog with plenty of toys and chew bones to keep them occupied while they’re in the crate. You may also want to put a blanket or towel in the crate to make them feel more comfortable.

If your dog starts to whine or bark while they’re in the crate, don’t give in and let them out. This will only reinforce the behavior. Instead, wait until they stop whining or barking and then let them out.

Crate training can be a bit of a challenge, but it’s well worth the effort. With a little patience and persistence, you can have a well-behaved big dog that loves their crate.



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