Crate Train An Older Dog

Many people don’t crate train their dogs because they think that it’s cruel. But, when done correctly, crate training can be a very humane way to train your dog. Crates can be especially helpful for older dogs, who may have trouble housetraining.

The key to successful crate training is to make sure that your dog sees the crate as a positive place. Start by putting a soft bed or towel in the crate, and giving your dog a treat every time he or she goes in. Once your dog is comfortable going into the crate, you can start using it for training.

If your dog has an accident in the house, put him or her in the crate for a short time. This will help your dog associate the crate with good things, such as treats and being praised.

Eventually, you can start using the crate as a place to leave your dog when you’re not home. This will help keep your dog safe and out of trouble.

Can You Still Train Older Dogs

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Older dogs can still be trained, but with a few caveats. The first is that their physical abilities may not be what they once were, so you may need to adjust the way you train them. The second is that their attention span and cognitive abilities may also have diminished, so you’ll need to be more patient and keep your sessions short and interesting.

One way to make training sessions more interesting for older dogs is to incorporate playtime into them. Play is a natural way for dogs to learn and it can keep them engaged and motivated. Games that teach basic commands, such as “sit” and “stay,” can be especially useful.

It’s also important to keep in mind that older dogs may not be as active as they used to be, so you may need to adjust their diet and exercise routine to keep them healthy. Regular vet checkups are also important, as older dogs are more prone to health problems.

With a little patience and creative thinking, you can still train your older dog and help them stay healthy and happy.

How Do You Kennel Train An Older Dog

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There are a few different methods you can use to kennel train an older dog. One common method is to set up a small area in your home, such as a bathroom or laundry room, where the dog can stay when you’re not home. The area should be small and comfortable, with a bed, water bowl, and a few toys. Start by putting the dog in the kennel for short periods of time, gradually increasing the amount of time the dog spends in the kennel. If the dog is having trouble adjusting to the kennel, you can try placing a treat or toy in the kennel to encourage the dog to go in.

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Another method for kennel training an older dog is to use a crate. A crate is a small, enclosed space that can be used to train dogs to stay in a certain area. Start by putting the dog in the crate for short periods of time, gradually increasing the amount of time the dog spends in the crate. If the dog is having trouble adjusting to the crate, you can try placing a treat or toy in the crate to encourage the dog to go in.

How To Train An Older Dog To Stay Off Furniture

It can be a challenge to train an older dog to stay off furniture, but it is possible. Some dogs may have been allowed to jump up on furniture when they were younger, and may now view it as their right. Others may be getting up there in age and find it difficult to get down from furniture without help.

The first step is to make sure that your dog is getting enough exercise. A tired dog is less likely to want to jump up on the furniture. If your dog is getting enough exercise, you can start working on training him to stay off the furniture.

One way to train an older dog to stay off the furniture is to use a deterrent. You can put a deterrent, such as a bitter apple spray, on the furniture to keep your dog from jumping up. You can also use a deterrent collar, which will emit a sound or spray a deterrent every time your dog tries to jump up.

You can also teach your dog to “sit” or “stay” on command to keep him from jumping up on the furniture. If your dog is getting up on the furniture, say “no” in a firm voice and have him sit or stay until he is off the furniture. Reward him with a treat when he obeys your commands.

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It may take some time and patience to train an older dog to stay off the furniture, but it is worth it in the end. With a little bit of work, you can have a dog who is happy to stay off the furniture and keep your furniture looking nice and clean.

Crate Training Older Dogs

It is never too late to crate train your dog! In fact, crate training can be especially beneficial for older dogs who may need a little help with housebreaking or who may be prone to mischief when left unsupervised.



The basics of crate training are simple: Dogs instinctively want to avoid soiling their sleeping area, so by putting them in a crate when you can’t supervise them, you can help them learn to control their bladder and bowel movements. The crate should be just big enough for your dog to stand up and turn around in, and should be equipped with a comfortable bed or blanket.

Begin by introducing your dog to the crate slowly, feeding him his meals inside the crate and rewarding him with treats when he enters. Once he is comfortable eating inside the crate, begin closing the door for short periods of time, gradually increasing the length of time he is confined. Be sure to praise your dog when he behaves calmly in the crate.

If your dog has a history of being destructive when left alone, you may need to continue crating him until he learns to behave himself. However, it is important to give your dog plenty of exercise and plenty of opportunities to relieve himself outdoors so that he doesn’t become frustrated or anxious in the crate.

Crate training can be a valuable tool for training your older dog, and can help make housetraining and obedience training easier for both of you.



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